Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness - Mark Twain

Thursday, December 31, 2015

10 Reasons To Study Abroad

1  Studying abroad is a life-altering experience!

Studying and living in a different culture will help you see the world from a completely different perspective. It is an amazing experience that will change your life.
        
2  Learn about yourself, be independent

Studying abroad is an occasion to challenge yourself with new situations that will test your abilities to adapt and learn. You may find yourself questioning some of your most long-held beliefs. All you need to succeed is an open mind and a good sense of humor. The perspective gained through a study abroad experience is second to none.
        
3  It's a chance to gain perspective on your own culture

Studying abroad is a chance to step outside of the ordinary and look at life from a completely new perspective. Many students return amazed that while studying abroad they learned just as much about the United States and its culture as they did about life in their host country.
        
Photo Courtesy: http://londonsnap.co.uk
4  You don't have to speak a foreign language to do it

All your courses will be taught by California Instructors, just like at home.

5  Resume building material

In today's global economy, study abroad can be a defining element to every student's undergraduate degree. Many companies increasingly desire leaders with the ability to live successfully in a variety of countries and work with co-workers of varying cultural backgrounds.

6  The program will work with any major

We offer a broad variety of transferable, General Education classes that can help you progress towards your major.  Any student can fit a study abroad experience into their academic schedule.

7  The program offers a unique academic structure

Studying abroad offers you the opportunity to escape the monotony of traditional lectures by providing programs that have a myriad of academic possibilities.  Our instructors are committed to making your host city into a classroom.  They will take advantage of all that is offered by one of the world’s great cities.

8  Why be just another tourist?

Studying abroad is your chance to travel and gain perspective at the same time (not to mention academic credit). So many people travel abroad and "see the sights" without understanding the greater importance or significance of those places or events. By studying abroad you get to spend a great deal more time overseas, and thus have the opportunity to ask a lot more in-depth questions.

9  Make connections that can last a lifetime

Away from home and open to new possibilities, you will meet and connect to people you would otherwise never encounter.  Those friendships can last a lifetime.

10 It’s not that expensive

Living away from home costs money no matter where you live. A semester abroad is not much more expensive than a semester at a CSU Campus.  A semester in Chico would cost about $12,000.  Study Abroad fees, courses & housing is about $8,000.   Meals, books and incidentals will add a little more and travel costs to Europe are slightly higher than to Chico…   But hey, you’re in Europe!

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Florence 2016 Schedule


Barcelona Schedule


Barcelona Meeting Dates & Times

@ DVC
Tu. 02/03             2-3 pm LA 114
Tu. 02/10             11-noon  BFL 210
Wed. 02/18         2-3 pm LA 118
Wed. 03/04         2-3 pm LA 118
Tu. 03/10             11-noon BFL 210

@ LMC
Tu. 01/27             noon-1pm L 105
Wed. 02/11         noon-1pm  L 105

@ SRC
Wed. 02/25         11-noon W 135

@ BRT
Tu. 02/24             11-noon TBA

@ CCC

Wed. 02/04         2-3pm TBA

2015 Faculty Application

Study Abroad Program information and guidelines:

The CCCCD Study Abroad program along with its partner colleges (San Mateo, Santa Rosa and Cosumnes River) sends approximately 120 - 150 local students and four faculty abroad for a 13 week semester program. Qualifying students must have satisfactorily completed 12 units of college level work. During the semester abroad, each student must maintain a minimum academic load of 12 units.
A typical full time assignment in the Study Abroad program involves three courses and a “Life and Culture” course,which is required for all students. Lecturers from the host country will provide a considerable amount of the content for this course. Faculty are expected to serve as instructors of record,provide supplemental lectures, issue grades and handle course coordination.

An instructor selected for the program has the opportunity to work in cooperation with faculty from other participating colleges. The proposed courses must be lower division transfer courses with appeal to a broad spectrum of students. Faculty are encouraged to select courses, which are particularly suited to being offered in a foreign setting. Full -time, tenured Faculty as of program start are eligible to participate in the semester study abroad programs. Priority will be given to faculty who have not recently participated in a Study Abroad Program.

Faculty Responsibilities
 Selected Faculty will do the following in preparation for their assignment abroad. Any person not willing and able to fulfill these obligations may be removed from the assignment. .2 of the Instructor's load while abroad is contingent upon successfully meeting these expectations.
 Maintain an active recruiting schedule, presenting in not fewer than fifteen classes each month and a minimum of four classes at each of the district’s campuses (DVC, LMC, CCC & SRVC).
 Attend all information meetings, approximately six to ten, for recruitment of students at DVC as well as other District campuses, even if these meetings conflict with one’s own classes (Administrative leave will be given.)
 AttendCCCCDStudyAbroadCommitteemeetingsthesemesterbeforegoingabroad.
 Faculty selected should expect to put in a minimum of two-five hours weekly in the recruitment process.
These recruitment activities are coordinated through the District Study Abroad Office.
 Attend required Consortium/AIFS meetings, including AIFS orientation program before leaving.
(Approximately two-three per program.)
 Attend an orientation session before departure.
 Participate in a program evaluation on site at conclusion of term.
 Attend a student/faculty “debriefing” event on return from program.
 Attend a CCCCD Study Abroad committee meeting on return to discuss the experience of the program fo r
the Committee.
 Attend FLEX workshop on Study Abroad to share experiences with prospective participants.

Supplemental information to attach to your application:
1) Identify the three CCC, DVC, or LMC courses you propose to teach in addition to the Life & Culture course. If you are recommending to teach courses outside your normal departmental teaching assignments, please consult with the Study Abroad Office and relevant department chair(s) prior to submitting your application.
2) Identify three alternate courses that you are qualified to teach (or have an FSA to teach) and would find appropriateunderthepreviouslymentionedguidelines. Alternatecoursesmaybeofferedinorderto avoid curriculum conflicts between selected faculty.
3) On a separate page, write a description of each course and describe how you will incorporate the foreign localeinyourinstruction. Describeanyspecialapproaches,directionsorgoalsthattheforeignlocale stimulatesyoutoenvision. Provideexamplesoffieldtripsandothersupplementaleducationalactivities you would provide for students during the semester abroad. This aspect of the application is the most important because the committee would like applicants to demonstrate their understanding of the potential for cultural enrichment of the curriculum.
4) Organizing, coordinating and developing course, programs and other learning experiences will be required. What have you done that demonstrates your ability to organize or initiate programs or activities?
Recruiting: Our experience indicates that the more active you are as a recruiter, at your own College, and at other colleges within the District, the more successful you will be in attracting students to the foreign studyprogram. Ourexperiencealsoindicatesthat,ifyoudon’tactivelyrecruit,thereisahighprobability that your portion of the program will be cancelled due to low enrollment. Faculty selected for Study Abroad Programs must attend all information sessions, plan and implement recruitment activities, participate in other recruitment efforts, including program promotion, student recruitment and student or ientation.
*In the event of lower than 20 students recruited, the following load/class reductions would follow:
(19-15 students = reduce one class; 14-10 students = reduce two classes; 9 or less = college cancellation for the semester).
5) What experiences do you have with regards to these activities, and what specific activities would you propose and execute for successful student recruitment?
6) Approximately 35 students may apply locally for the program. Are you prepared and willing to provide informaleducationalandpersonaladvisingandsupportservicesforthesestudents? Pleaseexplain.
Other Details:
7) Write a personal statement expressing why you desire to participate in the Study Abroad Program and,
a. Describe any experience you have supporting or participating in our District’s Study Abroad program during the last ten (10) years? If you have taught Abroad, please list program and date.
b. What individual or group travel experiences have you had?
c. While foreign language proficiency is not a requireme nt, please indicate the foreign languages you speak, write and/or read.
d. What special qualifications do you have that make you well suited to serve as a semester abroad faculty member?
e. Please feel free to add further information that will assist both the local faculty selection committee and the college consortium committee in making a final decision on the faculty/curriculum for the upcoming programs.
8) Faculty will earn their regular salary during the semester abroad program. Selected faculty will be pro vided with a $3,000 housing stipend and a complimentary round trip airfare or pro rata share thereof based on a 20:1 student ratio. Additional personal expenses can be expected such as rent, meals, surface travel, etc.
Will you be able to make the necessary personal and financial arrangements in order for you to participate in the program?
In the event of lower than 20 students recruited, the following load/class reductions would follow:
(19-15 students = reduce one class; 14-10 students = reduce two classes; 9 or less = college cancellation for the semester).
If your load was reduced (.80 or .60) due to low recruitment, would you be willing to remain a participant in theStudyAbroadProgram? YES/NO
(Should this become necessary, you could supplement the reduced load assignment with banked load in order to receive your full salary.)
When submitting your application packet, please take care to assure that your pages are numbered and your responses clearly identify the sections to which you are responding.

Submit this application (email or hardcopy) to:
Diablo Valley College Study Abroad Office c/o Harue Takanashi by 5:00 p.m., Thursday, February 12, 2015.
The pool of applicants will be reviewed by the District Study Abroad Faculty Selection Committee. That committee will select and interview Finalists before making its recommendation to the District Director of InternationalEducation.Interviews will be conducted Friday, February 20, 2015. Please keep that date open, should you be selected for an interview.

Approved by:
Study Abroad Programs Committee (08/2012), Faculty Senates Coordinating Council (09/2012)


BARCELONA Fall 2015 - COURSES & BIOS,

Los Medanos College Faculty: Kasey Gardner
(Contra Costa Community College District)

Kasey Gardner is a professor of Speech and Political Science at Los Medanos College. While teaching and chairing the Communication department, he also serves as Director of Forensics to the nationally ranked LMC Debate Team. Kasey joined LMC in 2011 after teaching at the University of San Francisco and the University of the Pacific. He has an M.A. in Political Rhetoric from the University of the Pacific and an MBA in Global Business from Saint Mary’s College of California. With research interests in political economy, behavioral economics, and intercultural communication, Kasey is devastating at pub trivia. When out of the classroom or out of the country, Kasey is an avid traveler, snowboarder, political junkie and sports fan.
Internationally, Kasey competed in the World Debate Championships in Cork, Ireland, in 2008, and has taught and conducted research in China, India and Egypt. Having recently completed his MBA in global business at Saint Mary’s College of California, Kasey brings a global perspective and a business focus to his approach in each class.
“Barcelona is a fascinating place to study political expression, advocacy, inter- and intra-national relations, and the contexts of global communication. There are few places better suited to get a flavor of European life than Catalonia. It will be very interesting to see how nations and their people manage the European Union’s influence with regional devolution and how those decisions are discussed and made.”

Spanish Life and Culture
(3 units) (Letter Grade only)
This is an introduction to Spanish society and civilization through presentations by Spanish guest lecturers and related field trips across Barcelona. It takes a social, historical, and cultural approach to the study of contemporary Spanish society. Topics include government, political parties, Church-State relations, Independence, as well as literature, art, and general aspects of Spanish life. This course is required for those students enrolled in the Semester in Barcelona whose program applications are processed through the Contra Costa Community College District.


POLS 43, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
(3 units) (Letter Grade)
Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 100, Intro to Composition and Reading CSU: Area D8 – Government and Legal Institutions
IGETC: Area 4G – Interdisciplinary and Social
Terrorism. Globalization. Nuclear proliferation. Do these issues matter to you? Would you like to understand the complex workings of global politics? Then this is the course for you! We will give you the tools you need to comprehend the fascinating realm of international relations and your place in it. We’ll explore the issues of foreign policy facing the U.S. and its friends and foes around the world. If you’d like to gain a deeper understanding of our global community and the common challenges we must confront, join us in POLSC-043.
Approach to Class: Hear the story of international relations told through the long and not often friendly relationship between Spain and the United States. How does the Catalan region change the positioning of the rest of Spain internationally? What does the European Union mean for the traditional nation state? Find out when Mr. Marshall finally does arrive in Barcelona!

SPEECH 110, SPEECH COMMUNICATION
(3 units) (Letter Grade)
Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 100, Intro to Composition and Reading CSU: Area A1 – Oral Communication
LMC AA: Area A, Communication Studies
IGETC: Area 1C – Oral Communication
Develop skills toward being a more effective public speaker and a critical listener. Learn to be clear, focused, direct, and interesting in a variety of contexts. This is an introduction to basic concepts and principles of public speaking, including methods of obtaining and organizing material for clarity of thought and development of both imaginative and discursive modes of verbal and nonverbal expression. Approach to Class: By infusing notable Spanish and Catalan people and their history into the topics of our course we will learn how to give a successful speech in the United States, Spain and every place in between. Barcelona is also an excellent location to be an audience member at many of the public venues throughout the city.

SPEECH 120, ARGUMENTATION
(3 units) (Letter Grade)
Recommended: eligibility for ENGL 100, Intro to Composition and Reading CSU: Area A1 or A3 – Critical Thinking or Communication
LMC AA: Communication Studies
IGETC: Area 1C – Oral Communication
Do you love to argue, but want to learn how to do so formally? In this class, you will study the principles of argumentation theory through lecture and class debates. We will be researching and analyzing current events, ethical and philosophical issues that affect our world and learning how to persuade an academic audience. It isn’t what you know it’s what you can prove, so take the argumentation challenge and prepare to make changes in our world.
Approach to Class: Our study of academic debate techniques will be made complete through relevant European and Spanish debate topics and the chance to make friends with and debate against members of the Spanish Universities Debating Network.

Santa Rosa Junior College Faculty: Mai Nazif

Mai moved to the Bay Area after completing her graduate studies at UCSB (MA Hispanic Linguistics). Beginning Fall 2007, Mai has taught all levels of Spanish at SRJC. She has traveled extensively, including: various regions of the Spanish-speaking world (Spain, the Dominican Republic, Cuba, Mexico, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Argentina, Uruguay), all over Europe, Syria, Japan, and Canada. Mai has been to Barcelona three times (most recently summer 2013), and for her, Barcelona is the maximum! She is looking forward to sharing the experience of the rich culture and diversity of Spain with the Study Abroad Program. Her only concern is that she might not come back (that’s how amazing Spain is)!

SPAN 1, Elementary Spanish-Part 1
4 Units/4 hours lecture, 1 hour by arrangement. Grade or P/NP. Recommended: Eligibility for English 1A. Not recommended for students who have successfully completed 2 years of high school Spanish or equivalent within the past 3 years. CSU/UC transferrable. AA/AS area E; CSU area C2; IGETC area 6A
Introduction to Spanish grammar and development of all language skills in a cultural context with special emphasis on inter-personal communication. This course will also examine grammar/vocabulary/dialectal aspects particular to Castilian Spanish. The cultural component will focus heavily on Spanish culture, to include compare/contrast to the language and culture of Latin America and the United States. Class activities will be tailored to focus on life in Spain.

SPAN 2, Elementary Spanish-Part 2
4 Units/4 hours lecture, 1 hour by arrangement. Grade or P/NP. Prerequisite: Two years of high school Spanish or SPAN 1. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent. Transferrable CSU/UC. AA/AS area E; CSU area C2; IGETC areas 3B, 6A
Part Two of Elementary Spanish, continued introduction to Spanish grammar and development of language skills in a cultural context with special emphasis on communication. This course will also examine grammar/vocabulary/dialectal aspects particular to Castilian Spanish. The cultural component will focus heavily on Spanish culture, to include compare/contrast to the language and culture of Latin America and the United States. Class activities will be tailored to focus on life in Spain.

SPAN 3, Intermediate Spanish-Part 1
4 Units/4 hours lecture, 1 hour by arrangement. Grade or P/NP. Prerequisite: Course Completion of SPAN 2 OR Course Completion of SPAN 2S. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent. CSU/UC transferrable. AA/AS area E; CSU area C2; IGETC areas 3B, 6A
Speaking, reading and writing in Spanish with discussions and essays to develop linguistic skill and cultural knowledge, bridging from first-year linguistic and cultural content. This course will also examine grammar/vocabulary/dialectal aspects particular to Castilian Spanish. The cultural component will focus heavily on Spanish culture, to include compare/contrast to the language and culture of Latin America and the United States. Class activities will be tailored to focus on life in Spain.


SPAN 4, Intermediate Spanish-Part 2
4 Units/4 hours lecture, 1 hour by arrangement. Grade or P/NP. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 3 or 4 years of high school Spanish. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent. CSU/UC transferrable. AA/AS areas E, G; CSU area C2; IGETC areas 3B, 6A.
Development of Spanish language skills in a cultural context at an intermediate level. Emphasis is on communication, with discussion, essays and readings to assure control of linguistic and cultural principles. Includes a review of intermediate linguistic content and cultural topics. This course will also examine grammar/vocabulary/dialectal aspects particular to Castilian Spanish. The cultural component will focus heavily on Spanish culture, to include compare/contrast to the language and culture of Latin America and the United States. Class activities will be tailored to focus on life in Spain.

Skyline College Faculty: Ilana Crispi

Ilana Crispi is a San Francisco-based educator and visual artist. She teaches studio practice and art history at Skyline College and City College of San Francisco. Ilana received her MFA from Mills College and BA from Brown University. She spent a year studying abroad at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. She also worked with independent artists, and attended drawing sessions at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid, Spain. Ilana was the recipient of the Eklind Fellowship and the Resident Artist at the Montalvo Arts Center, the de Young Museum in San Francisco, and at the Rochester Folk Art Guild in New York. Her work has been shown at conventional and alternative sites including public streets, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Ramon’s Tailor, Southern Exposure, Artist's Television Access, the de Young Museum in San Francisco and the Children's Discovery Museum in San Jose. Her most recent artwork involved transforming soil from the Tenderloin in San Francisco into furniture and functional vessels, in which locally harvested honey and tea were served. The soil was gathered from a site where she taught community art classes.

ART 101, History of Western Art I
3 units; minimum 48 lecture hours/semester. Grade or P/NP. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent (same as SRJC’s ENGL 1A). Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).
Comprehensive survey of the history of architecture, painting and sculpture in the western world and the relation of art to the development of history. Illustrated lectures. Special attention will be given to Spanish art and architecture (Altamira cave paintings and beyond). Spanish art will be contextualized within the larger canon of Western art and history.

ART 102, History of Western Art II
3 units; minimum 48 lecture hours/semester. Grade or P/NP. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 100 or equivalent (same as SRJC’s ENGL 1A). Transfer credit: UC; CSU (C1).
Comprehensive survey of the history of architecture, painting and sculpture in the western world and the relation of art to the development of history. Illustrated lectures. Special attention will be given to Spanish art and architecture (El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Goya, Gaudí, etc.). Spanish art will be contextualized within the larger canon of Western art and history.

ART 201/202, Drawing and Composition
3 units; minimum of 32 lecture hours and 48 lab hours plus 16 lab hours by arrangement per term. Transfer credit: UC; CSU
Basic drawing course for college students. Study of two- and three-dimensional form and space relationships and the elements of design in pictorial composition. Sequence of problems based on still life. Drawing in various dry media. Historical and contemporary examples of drawings and compositions by Spanish artists will be included.

Sacramento City College/Faculty: Stephen James
“In my experience with students and my own kids, travel and Study Abroad Programs open you up to an entire world of different ideas, foods, art and culture. These types of programs change people’s lives!”
Stephen James has been teaching biology at Sacramento City College since 1998. He teaches in the Field Ecology Program, specifically courses in Environmental Biology, Natural History, Marine Biology, Environmental Regulations, Field Methods in Ecology, and the Natural History of Baja California. Academically, he has an Associate Degree (AA) in Liberal Studies from Glendale Community College (1978), Bachelor of Arts Degrees in Environmental Studies (1979, with an emphasis in History) and Biology (1984, with an emphasis in Aquatic Biology) from UC Santa Barbara, and a Master of Science Degree in Biology (1996) from CSU, Sacramento.
He has visited 23 US states as well as the District of Columbia and the US Virgin Islands. He has led classes and ecological tours to Baja California (Mexico) and Belize. His travels have also taken him to Canada, French Polynesia, England, Spain, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Italy, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland.

BIOL 350, Environmental Biology
3 Units
Prerequisite: None.
General Education: AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B Course Transferable to UC/CSU
Hours: 54 hours lecture
This course provides both biology majors and non-majors with instruction in human interactions with the environment and resolutions to potential conflicts that develop due to this interaction. Understanding how life affects environments and ecosystems is an integral part of the biological sciences. To achieve this understanding, biological and ecological principles are examined as they relate to the natural environment. Major topics include the function and structure of ecosystems and ecological processes, the effects of natural selection on populations, the role of biodiversity on the maintenance of ecosystems, the variety of human impacts on terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric systems, potential solutions to adverse impacts, and the application of the scientific method in the examination of these effects. At least one field trip will be required.

BIOL 351, Global Climate Change
3 Units
Prerequisite: None.
General Education: AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B Course Transferable to UC/CSU
Hours: 54 hours lecture
This interdisciplinary course explores the natural and human factors causing the Earth's climate to change. Whether alarmed, skeptical, or just curious about climate change, this course will provide the scientific tools to analyze the evidence that climate change is a looming threat. Through lectures, readings, discussions and projects, students will examine the Earth's present and past climates as well as the influence of climate on the geographical distribution of plants, animals and human societies. At least one field trip will be required.

BIOL 352, Conservation Biology
3 Units
Prerequisite: None.
General Education: AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B Course Transferable to UC/CSU
Hours: 54 hours LEC
This introductory course covers biological and ecological principles involved in understanding and analyzing environmental problems and exploring scientifically sound conservation techniques. Major topics include the nature of science, basic principles of ecology, genetics and evolution, patterns of biodiversity and extinction, and the interdependence between humans and our environment. This course places emphasis on scientific processes and methodology and the application of science to conservation issues. At least one field trip will be required. 

Monday, July 7, 2014

Fall 2014 Florence Information meetings


Florence SP 15 Informational meeting (Fall 14)

DVC
W  09/10   3:30-4:30 pm  LA119
T    09/23   2:00-3:00 pm  LA114
W  10/01   3:30-4:30 pm  LA119
M  10/13   5:00-6:00 pm   LA119
T    10/21  2:00-3:00 pm   LA114
LMC
W  09/17  3:30 -4:30 pm   L106 (library)
SRC
M  09/08  3:30-4:30 pm   W135


Want to get ready for your trip?  
Sign up for our 1 unit prep course offered this fall!

SOCSC-155B - Florence: Preparing for your Study Abroad trip
10/22/2014 - 12/10/2014
W
2:00PM - 4:05PM
BFL  102