Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness - Mark Twain

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Florence Spring 2013 Course Options

Italian Life, Language and Culture
Course Description and Objectives 
This will be taught by visiting lecturers, and will focus upon such topics as politics, food, social customs, and history. There will be midterms and finals upon topics that will be determined by all faculty for all participants in our program.

Michele A. Krup, Diablo Valley College
ART-105 Introduction to Drawing, Color, and Two Dimensional Design, (SC) 3 units
(May be repeated once. 36 hours lecture/72 hours laboratory per term. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL-116/118 or equivalent. CSU, UC
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)
drawing for a flying machine
Course Description and Objectives
This course includes an introduction to drawing concepts and techniques, linear perspective and color theory fundamentals, with an emphasis on design principles and composition.  Students will learn to identify the elements that define two-dimensional art and design and be able to demonstrate basic drawing skills, color manipulation and application of design principles.  Students will have the opportunity to critique their own artwork and the artwork of others. 

The class will include lectures, demonstrations of drawing techniques, guided studio practice, and field trips to museums, galleries, and public spaces in Florence. The field trips will afford students the opportunity to view and research historical and contemporary drawing styles, materials, and techniques as well as study examples of Florence’s architecture, public sculpture, piazza design, and museum exhibitions.  Examination of these examples will be used to support the classroom lessons in drawing techniques, linear perspective and color theory.  Students will have the opportunity to engage with their observations and demonstrate expression through analysis and discussion of the role of materials and the role of the artist in selected works. Studio practice time will further provide students a creative environment in which to practice the application of traditional drawing techniques and painting materials in the completion of course assignments.
DAYS/TIMES: Lec/Lab hours /week TBD

ART-106 Drawing and Composition, (SC) 3 units


(May be repeated once. 36 hours lecture/72 hours laboratory per term. Recommended: ART 105 or equivalent; eligibility for ENGL 116/118 or equivalent.  CSU, UC


Raffaello Sanzio (Raphael) (1483-1520)
The School of Athens
Course Description and Objectives


This course will focus on a continued exploration of drawing concepts, descriptive drawing, and logical rendering of form with an emphasis on stylistic development.  Students will explore traditional drawing materials with additional color media such as pastel and conte crayon.  Instruction and exercises will focus on the improvement of students’ ability to draw from direct observation as well as refine their ability to critique their artwork and the artwork of others presented in class.  Students will create a portfolio of artwork demonstrating their individual expression and conceptual skills. 


The class will include lectures, demonstrations of drawing techniques, guided studio practice, and field trips with special emphasis on drawing from the rich Florentine visual experience.  Class walking tours will provide students the opportunity to practice observational drawing and hone visual skills through direct encounters with historical and contemporary drawing styles, materials, and techniques as well as to study examples of Florence’s architecture, public sculpture, piazza design, and museum exhibitions.  Students will explore the personal relationships between artists and collectors to the city-environment – not to mention the art of everyday living in a Florentine neighborhood – in visits to local artists’ workshops.  Materials and techniques will be researched and student will have the opportunity to examine and demonstrate a refined expression with traditional drawing materials.  DAYS/TIMES: Lec/Lab hours /week TBD

ARTHS-196 History of Medieval and Renaissance Art, (SC) 3 units
(54 hours lecture per term Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 116/118 or equivalent). CSU, UC
A History of Western art from the Early Christian Period through the Renaissance.  Stylistic changes are related to significant social and cultural changes.
Basilica Santa Maria di Fiore, (1463, year consecrated)
architects: Arnolfo di Cambio, Filippo Brunelleschi
Course Description and Objectives
This course traces the history of Western art from the Early Christian Period through the Renaissance.  Stylistic changes are identified and related to significant social and cultural changes.  Consideration is given to the changing role of the artist socially, culturally, and within patronage systems.  Students will examine works of art and their iconography, stylistic techniques, and different media with the goal of recognizing, understanding, and discussing various art forms in their broader contexts. 

Students will have the full advantage of viewing examples of Florence’s architecture, public sculptures, piazzas, galleries and exceptional museums to support the learning experience. Fieldtrips to the city’s churches, galleries, and museums will enhance classroom lessons.  With the aid of these first hand experiences, students will be able to analyze works of art in terms of historical circumstances and cultural values of Western Europe from the early Christian period through the Renaissance.  Students will compare and contrast painting, sculpture, and architecture using an art historical vocabulary in the various styles of the chronological periods. 

The class will focus on distinguishing differences in patronage and art production in Medieval and Renaissance art and architecture.  Students will appraise the changing role of the artist in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.  The class will visit local artists’ workshops and art collections to explore the personal relationships between artists/collectors and their city-environment. These visits will also encourage students to explore the art of everyday living in a Florentine neighborhood (what would Michelangelo have eaten for his lunch?). 
DAYS/TIMES: Lec  hours /week TBD

ARTHS-197 History of Baroque to Early 20th Century Art, (SC) 3 units
(54 hours lecture per term. Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 116/118 or equivalent). CSU, UC
A history of Western art from the 17th century to early 20th century.  Stylistic changes are related to significant social and cultural changes. Consideration is given to the changing role of the artist.  
Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1651)
Judith beheading Holofernes
Course Description and Objectives
This course traces the development of art in the western hemisphere from the Baroque period through the early 20th century.  Social, economic, cultural, political, religious, and technological influences on the art of each period are included in the scope of the course.    
Students will examine works of art and their iconography, stylistic techniques, and different media with the goal of recognizing, understanding, and discussing various art forms in their broader contexts.   Students will have the full advantage of viewing examples of Florence’s architecture, public sculptures, piazzas, galleries and museums to support the learning experience.  Fieldtrips to the city’s churches, galleries, and museums will enhance classroom lessons. 
Students will be able to analyze works of art in terms of historical circumstances and cultural values of Western Europe from the Baroque period to early 20th century.  The class will offer opportunities to compare and contrast painting, sculpture, and architecture using appropriate aesthetic vocabulary in the various styles of the chronological periods: Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Expressionism, Cubism, and Futurism.  Students will be able to distinguish differences in patronage within these centuries and evaluate the changing role of the artist.
DAYS/TIMES: Lec  hours /week TBD
  
Bob Duxbury, Santa Rosa Junior College
Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564)
David
English 1B
Course Description and Objectives 
This is an introduction to literature, and will focus upon all of the four major genres. We will also study Florence-related texts, including Room With A View by E. M. Forster, and Italo Calvino's If On A Winter's Night A Traveler.

Humanities 7
Course Description and Objectives 
Half of the class will take place in the classroom, where we will study the background to Renaissance Art and Culture. The other half of the class will be visits to museums every week, so that we may have a hands-on approach to our unique Florentine classroom.

English 27
Course Description and Objectives 
This is an introduction to Shakespeare. We will focus upon comedy, tragedy, the history plays, and sonnets, along with one so-called problem play. We shall look at Shakespeare's plays that take place in a nominal Italy, such as Romeo and Juliet and Merchant of Venice. 

Liz Nelson, Consumnes River College


PSYC 320 Social Psychology 3 Units Prerequisite: None. General Education: AA/AS Area V (b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4ICourse Transferable to UC/CSU Hours: 54 hours LEC 
Course Description and Objectives
This course focuses on the scientific study of human interaction, with an emphasis on the individual within a social context. Study includes: social perception, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, the self and social identity, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, social influence, pro-social behavior, aggression, and group behavior. What better place to study how people are different in groups than in a foreign country! Students will be having the experience of observing and testing theories learned in class in a living laboratory. We will be watching interactions among Italians and interviewing them to understand cultural differences in linguistics, prejudice, conformity, attitude change, relationships, power issues, group process, obedience, and cultural differences. It will truly be exciting to study social psychology in a country that has experienced several political changes over its vast history including the Romans, the Renaissance, kingdoms, Fascism, war, and economic strife.


PSYC 340 Abnormal Behavior 3 Units Prerequisite: None. General Education: AA/AS Area III (b); AA/AS Area V (b); CSU Area D2; CSU Area E; IGETC Area 4 Course Transferable to UC/CSU Hours: 54 hours LEC
Course Description and Objectives
This course is an exploration of the broad questions of normality and abnormality. It offers the investigation of specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties and current approaches to psychological intervention including present community mental health practice. This course considers the contribution of social, biological and psychological factors to the development and persistence of behavior disorders. PSYC 340 would be a useful course for students majoring in Human Services and/or preparing for a career in psychology or the helping professions. In order to understand what is abnormal, we need to study what is considered normal. Normality is viewed from a cultural context. Is abnormality the same as viewed from an Italian culture as an American culture? Culture affects how mental illness is interpreted, the type of interventions used, and who seeks treatment from a professional versus a nontraditional route. Several advances in treatment of abnormality were from Italy. Did you know that a group of Italian neuroscientists, lead by Ugo Cerletti, introduced the world to electroconvulsive therapy in 1938.
"The social psychology of this century reveals a major lesson: often it is not so much the kind of person a man is as the kind of situation in which he finds himself that determines how he will act." (Milgram, 1974)


In 1978, the Basaglia Law was passed to shut down mental institutions across Italy and replace them with small community hospital psychiatric units and day centers. We will study abnormal psychology by watching interactions among Italians and interviewing Italians to understand differences in understanding of mental illness. We will visit museums to examine the representation of mental illness in art and culture. We will learn about the treatment of mental illness in Italy and how it compares to the United States.  “To be normal is the ideal aim of the unsuccessful.” (Jung)


PSYC 368 Cross Cultural Psychology 3 Units Prerequisite: None. General Education: AA/AS Area V (b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D3; CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I Course Transferable to UC/CSU Hours: 54 hours LEC
Course Description and Objectives
This course explores the impact of cultural influences on the psychological and individual development of ethnic group members. Emphasis will be placed on integrating traditional theoretical approaches and current cross-cultural statistical research and theory in the study of African-Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, gays & lesbians, the elderly, and the disabled.


One concept we will focus on is cultural encapsulation. Many of us view the world from our own culture, and we may not be open to understanding or accepting other world views. Most Americans come from an individualistic culture where the focus is on the individual; whereas, the Italian culture is collectivistic, and the focus is on the community. This is reflected in the religion, family relationships, rituals, and other cultural phenomenon in Italy. As we learn about other cultures, you may find yourself examining your own culture of origin, and how you fit into the world. Not all of the learning will take place in the classroom. We will be watching interactions among Italians to understand cultural differences in terms of linguistics, communications, relationships, expression of emotion, locus of control, time, and achievement orientation. We will visit museums to understand the representation of cultural differences. Students will be required to keep a journal on critical experiences based on interactions with the community.  “No culture can live, if it attempts to be exclusive.” Gandhi


Michael Stanford, San Mateo Community College

HIST 100: HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I
Units (Grade Option) 3; Class Hours: Minimum of 48 lecture hours/ semester; Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 110; Prerequisite(s): None.
Course Description and Objectives 
This course explores and analyzes the history of Western Civilization from antiquity to the early modern era. We will be studying the ancient world by visiting Greek, Etruscan, and Roman monumental architecture and archeological sites as well as the incredible antiquities museums in Florence, Rome, Naples, and other locations.  For the Middle Ages, Florence and other locations close by will offer an amazing first hand look at Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals and paintings.  Our study of the Renaissance, of course, will be ideal given that students will be living in what was the heart of Renaissance Italy. Students will literally be surrounded by the greatest examples of Renaissance architecture, painting and sculpture, and painting, and will be able to experience first hand the world that they are studying.  Transfer: CSU: C2, UC. (IGeTC: 3B)

HIST 101: HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II
Units (Grade Option) 3; Class Hours: Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester; Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 110; Prerequisite(s): None
Course Description and Objectives
This course explores and analyzes the history of Western Civilization from the early modern era to the present.  We will begin with the transition of Italian styles of art and architecture to the Baroque and Rococo.  Here we will integrate the history of the Catholic Church and the Reformation with visits to key sites in Florence, Rome, and other locations.  For our studies of 17th and 18th century Europe we will use such subjects as Palladian architecture and Venetian painting and take a trip to Venice and specific sites in the Veneto.  With the Scientific Revolution we will focus on Galileo, tutor to the Medici princes and the paradigm shift he helped set in motion.  Our study of the Enlightenment and then the Age of Revolution will include a reading of Il Gattopardo (The Leopard) by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, which will take us to the unification of Italy during the 19th century.  For Europe during the 20th century we will examine Italian Futurism in painting and the darker side of era with Mussolini and WWII.  Transfer: CSU: C2, UC. (IGeTC: 3B)

HIST 201: U.S. HISTORY I (Colonies to Reconstruction)
Units (Grade Option) 3; Class Hours: Minimum of 48 lecture hours/semester; Recommended: Eligibility for ENGL 110; Prerequisite(s): None.
Course Description and Objectives
This course explores and analyzes U.S. history from pre-Columbian times to 1877. 
While in Florence students will study the birth of the United States within the larger context of Western Civilization, the Columbian Exchange and the growth of the trans-Atlantic economy.  With Florence being one of the key northern Italian city-states we will be ideally situated to study the growth of capitalism in the Mediterranean and the subsequent impetus to exploration.  As a case studies we will use the Medici family and then the Genovese Cristoforo Colombo (Christopher Columbus) to bring us to European contact with the Americas.  The Age of Enlightenment will also serve as a direct link between Europe and the birth of the United States.  Through our study of ancient Roman  and 18th century art and architecture we will also be able to explore neoclassicism and its impact on American architectural styles.  Transfer: CSU: C2, UC. (IGeTC: 3B)

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